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“The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” by C. S. Lewis

Saturday, June 04, 2011 - Book Reading
“The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” by C. S. Lewis

Back of the Book:

The things in the picture were moving. It didn’t look at all like a cinema either; the colors were too real and clean and out-of-doors for that. Down went the prow of the ship into the wave and up went a great shock of spray. Through this enchanted painting, Edmund and Lucy, accompanied by their unwilling and unpleasant cousin Eustace, once again enter the magical world of Narnia. Once aboard the magnificent ship Dawn Treader, Edmund and Lucy are reunited with their old friends Caspian, the young King, and Reepicheep, the daring Mouse. They embark on a noble voyage to find the seven lords of Narnia who were banished during the dark rule of Caspian’s evil uncle Miraz. Unforeseeable adventures and dangers await them as they sail farther and farther from charted waters toward the “utter East” that Reepicheep has dreamed of since his youth. It is there he hopes to find the mystical home of Aslan, the majestic Lion and King and Lord of all Narnia.

From School Library Journal:

Grade 4-8-In the third book in C.S. Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia (but the fifth installment in Focus on the Family’s Radio Theatre production), Edmund and Lucy Pevensy along with their bratty cousin, Eustace, are transported through a painting into Narnia where they join Prince Caspian on a voyage to the west. The children are tested on this voyage, and visit strange lands and encounter unusual creatures. Eustace is turned into a dragon, and then helped to return to human form by Aslan, the lion god. This outstanding full-cast dramatization adheres closely to the book’s text. Recorded in London, actor Paul Scofield is the storyteller, and other parts are dramatically read by other British actors. The production features sound effects and background music, which sometimes becomes obtrusive. While adults might find the story a little dated at times and the religious elements somewhat heavy handed, children will not notice and will enjoy the story. This is a more complete version of the story than the excellent BBC production available from Bantam Audiobooks (1998).
Louise Sherman, formerly Anna C. Scott School, Leonia, NJ
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Pages: 256

Published: 1952

Format Read: ebook

[xrr rating=4.5/5]

The very worst thing about this book are the Dufflepuds. They creep me out. O_o

The very best thing about this book is Reepicheep. And their entrance into Narnia: entering a different world through a painting is just too cool for words!

Challenges:

This book will be placed under the 2011 E-Book Reading Challenge, the 2011 Fantasy Reading Challenge, the Chronicles of Narnia Read-Along 2011, and the What’s in a Name 4.

Occasionally Important Information:

"The Silver Chair" by C. S. Lewis
"Prince Caspian" by C. S. Lewis

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