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“Messenger” by Lois Lowry

Tuesday, July 12, 2011 - Book Reading
“Messenger” by Lois Lowry

Back of the Book:

For the past six years, Matty has lived in Village and flourished under the guidance of Seer, a blind man, known for his special sight. Village was a place that welcomed newcomers, but something sinister has seeped into Village and the people have voted to close it to outsiders. Matty has been invaluable as a messenger. Now he must make one last journey through the treacherous forest with his only weapon, a power he unexpectedly discovers within himself.

From Booklist:

Like Lowry’s hugely popular Newbery winner, The Giver (1993), this story dramatizes ideas of utopia gone wrong and focuses on a young person who must save his world. Teenage Matty lives with his caregiver in the Village, a place of refuge, where those fleeing poverty and persecution are welcomed with kindness and find a home. But the Village people are changing, and many have voted to build a wall to keep the newcomers out. The metaphor of the wall and the rage against immigrants (“They can’t even speak right”) will certainly reach out to today’s news images for many readers. But Lowry moves far beyond message, writing with a beautiful simplicity rooted in political fable, in warm domestic detail, and in a wild natural world, just on the edge of realism. Matty lives with his blind caregiver, Seer. Both of them were driven from home and nearly perished. The drama is in their affection; in the small details of how they cook, care for their puppy, and tease one another. Matty teases Seer about his blindness, even though they both know Seer sees more than most. In contrast is the terror of Matty’s secret powers and the perilous journey he must undertake to save the Village. The physical immediacy of his quest through a dark forest turned hostile brings the myth very close and builds suspense to the last heart-wrenching page. Hazel Rochman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Pages: 169

Published: 2004-04-26

Format Read: ebook

[xrr rating=4.5/5]

The very worst thing about this book is it feels like an afterthought. This book is where you finally realize that “The Giver” and “Gathering Blue” are part of a trilogy and the characters come together in this story. However, it doesn’t seem to fit quite right. It seems to me as though the first book was written as a stand alone novel, but was ambiguous enough at the end that she could tie “Gathering Blue” to it when she decided she wanted to write another book to go with “Gathering Blue.” Was that confusing? O_o

The very best thing about this book is that it’s still as interesting, entertaining, thought provoking, and amazing as the pervious books. Thank goodness for that!! :-D

Challenges:

This book will be placed under the 42 Challenge 2011, the 2011 E-Book Reading Challenge, the 2011 Futuristic/Sci-Fi Reading Challenge, and the The Dystopia Challenge.

Occasionally Important Information:

"The Two Towers" by J. R. R. Tolkien
"Gathering Blue" by Lois Lowry

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