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“The Lightning Thief” by Rick Riordan

Wednesday, November 09, 2011 - Book Reading
“The Lightning Thief” by Rick Riordan

Back of the Book:

After getting expelled from yet another school for yet another clash with mythological monsters only he can see, twelve-year-old Percy Jackson is taken to Camp Half-Blood, where he finally learns the truth about his unique abilities: He is a demigod, half human, half immortal. Even more stunning: His father is the Greek god Poseidon, ruler of the sea, making Percy one of the most powerful demigods alive. There’s little time to process this news. All too soon, a cryptic prophecy from the Oracle sends Percy on his first quest, a mission to the Underworld to prevent a war among the gods of Olympus.

This first installment of Rick Riordan’s best-selling series is a non-stop thrill-ride and a classic of mythic proportions.

Mark’s Review on Goodreads.com:

The concept in itself is very creative. Son of a Greek god in modern times. He is dyslexic because he is meant to read ancient greek. That’s clever. The translation of Greek gods to 21st, some were pretty well done, except for a few details here and there (a greek god would sick robot spiders against his enemies? Really?) The concept had promise. I, however, find the story horribly executed. (read the entire review here)

Pages: 377

Published: 2005-06-12

Format Read: real book

[xrr rating=4.5/5]

The very worst thing about this book is that I spend most of the time comparing it to Harry Potter because of what tons of people/reviews said about it being “the next Harry Potter,” which it isn’t. Or wasn’t considering the length of time the book has been out. To call this book/series another Harry Potter is to do it a disservice. When compared to Harry Potter, this book fails miserable, but only because it succeeds spectacularly in a different way. Doesn’t make sense? Read the book! :-p

The very best thing about this book is the mythology! I know, Riordan doesn’t always get it right, but that doesn’t bother me one bit! I love this book and happily reread it when I think it’s time.

By the way, the books “The Lost Hero” and “The Son of Neptune” (previously reviewed) are part of the sequel series. If you want to read those books, it helps to read these first.

Challenges:

This book will be placed under the 2011 Fantasy Reading Challenge and One, Two, Theme 2011.

Occasionally Important Information:

"The Sea of Monsters" by Rick Riordan
"Everfound" by Neal Shusterman

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